Reverse Image Search with Google

Did you know you can search a picture? If you ever wanted to find out information about an image, you can use Google’s “Reverse image search.” Google can then find related images and tell you what websites are hosting them. Images of a place can lead you to a more specific location. If your image contains people, it may pull up their social media profiles to tell you more about who they are.

 

There are two easy ways to search your image. If it’s a file on your computer, you can upload it to Google. Go to images.google.com and click the camera icon in the search box. Click “Upload and image” and then “Choose file.” Select the file from your computer.

1

 

If it is on the web, you can right click and search for it if you are using Google’s browser, Chrome. Right click on any image you see on a website, click “Search Google for this image” and a new tab will bring up your search results.

Click to enlarge

Expand Your Practice with Client Centric Strategies

Preserving the old ways from being abused.
Protecting the new ways, for me and for you.
What more can we do?
- The Kinks, Village Green Preservation Society

Lawyers in Chicago can look forward to Spring for change and renewal – and the Client Centric Strategies conference on 4/15 at the Chicago Bar Association! The headlines in the legal news consistently speak of the changing legal marketplace, whether meeting the needs of the modest means client or learning to solve problems for clients with the help of automation, artificial intelligence, and expert systems. Have you heard about the need for change, but haven’t done it yet because you are waiting for guidance, help, or to see who goes first? Well, there are lawyers who have taken the opportunities to expand their client base and embrace change by leveraging alternative fees, proactive legal services, unconventional law firm business entities, document automation and more to provide quality services and help close the justice gap. On April 15 at the Chicago Bar Association we have invited some of these lawyers – from Chicago and beyond – to talk about what they have done and what they have learned. Then we will invite you to discuss ideas and concerns to help move the conversation from thought to finish, focusing on building resources and tool kits to provide lawyers the guidance they need to move forward. You will leave with practical and ready to use resources to help you get out in front of the changes happening around the profession in a way that is good for both you and your clients.

Sessions will have breakout discussions and include:

  • Lessons from the Client Perspective: Transforming the Delivery of Legal Services
  • Redefining the Role of the Lawyer through Preventive Lawyering, Legal Health Checks and Group/Prepaid Legal Plans
  • Compensation Models
  • Emerging Delivery Models
  • and more!

SPEAKERS:
Trevor Clarke, The Chicago Bar Foundation
Margaret Duval, Domestic Violence Legal Clinic
Eleanor “Nora” Endzel, Endzel Law, LLC
Bob Glaves, The Chicago Bar Foundation
Karin Galldin, Canadian Bar Association
Will Hornsby, American Bar Association
Fred Headon, Canadian Bar Association; Air Canada
Conor Malloy, SMNP Law, LLP
Catherine Sanders Reach, The Chicago Bar Association
Nicolle L. Schippers, ARAG North America, Inc.
Sara Smith, American Bar Association
Bert “Tiger” Whitehead, Access Legal Care, PLLC

Learn more and register now at the Chicago Bar Association website

Looking for some immediate guidance?  See the Chicago Bar Foundation’s Pricing Toolkit:

And some food for thought:

Let’s go beyond the discussion and move to action, learning from leaders who have started forging the path to change.

 

Google Drive Collaboration Cheat Sheet

Even if you have been using Google Drive for multi-user collaboration since the day it came out, there is always more to learn. Below are a few tips and tricks I learned while researching the topic for a complete (but quick) guide to Google Drive Collaboration for Attorney at Work:

Using an Existing File to Share

If you upload a Microsoft Office document to Google Drive it automatically converts to a Google document,  sheet or slides (unless you are using the Office Editing for Docs, Sheets & Slides Chrome extension), but it can be downloaded to a .docx format when you are finished editing (go to the File menu and select “Download as” to see all of the options).  If you have a Microsoft Office document that is heavily styled or formatted, though, you will likely lose some or all of the formatting.

Turn on Sharing: The Invitations

If the invitee does not have a Google account she will be invited to create one. One wrinkle: If the invitee does have a Google account, but you used a different email address when inviting her to collaborate, she will need to request access to the document from the email associated with her Google account.

You might not want everyone to have editing rights. You can choose to give invitees edit capability, comment-only, or view-only rights. No matter what level of editing rights they have, they must log in to access the documents. If you click on the (tiny) “Advanced” link in the sharing dialog box you will see more options, such as “Prevent editors from changing access and adding new people” and “Disable options to download, print, and copy for commenters and viewers.” Toggle these on and click “Save changes” to further refine user rights.

Multi-User Editing

Once you have established permissions and invited collaborators, invitees can open the document and begin typing. If several people are in the document at the same time you will notice that their identities will appear at the top of the document as avatars. You can have real-time chat by clicking on the speech bubble icon next to their avatars. You can follow changes made by other users in real time, too, because each user is associated with a color. You can see a colored cursor with their name hovering over it, as their edits appear. If you want to see the last place another user edited, just click on their avatar and to jump to their last edit.

Comments and Suggestions

Like MS Word, comments are preserved with the document. Clicking on a comment in the comment pane will take you to the place in the document the comment references. Users in the document can respond to comments by clicking on the comment box and typing in the “reply.” Once a comment has been responded to and users want to dismiss the comment, simply mouse over the comment box and click the “Resolve” button that appears there to remove the comment thread and archive it. Resolved too soon? Click on “Comments” at the top of the screen, scroll to the closed thread and click to “re-open”.

Much like the Review features in Microsoft Word, Google has “Suggesting” (equivalent to Word’s Track Changes feature).  In the upper right, in the same toolbar as the editing features (like bold, italics, etc.) click on the arrow next to the pen icon and choose “suggestions”. Now, changes will show inline on the document, color coded to the user and also appear in the Comments pane on the right side of the document. There is no accept all/reject all workflow, instead users must accept or reject each change. Users with Comment-only permissions can make suggested changes to the document as well, though only users with edit rights can accept changes.

If you upload a Word document that already has tracked changes, those tracked changes will be converted to suggestions in the Google document. Likewise, suggestions in a Google Doc saved back to .docx and opened in Word will appear as tracked changes.

Version History

One last useful feature to mention in Google docs collaboration is the Revision history. Go to File – See revision history to open a panel that shows all edits and revisions to the document and who made them. You can click on the timestamp in the right panel to see previous version of the file and revert (restore) to previous versions. Restoring to a previous version doesn’t eliminate any versions, but merely moves it to the top of your revision history.

If you want to just see new changes since you last opened a document click on “See new changes” from the File menu. Like versions, added text is highlighted, and deleted text has a strikethrough. This feature is only available for docs.

Conclusion

Google Drive for collaboration with multiple people is as simple or as sophisticated as you need it to be. It reduces reliance on email, addresses version control and is a great way to get a project started.

Quickly Change Letter Casing in Microsoft Word

It was there all along, but you may not have noticed it: the capitalization menu in Microsoft Word.

1

Click to enlarge

 

Quickly change the casing in any word document by highlighting the selected text, mousing over to the Change Case menu and click the dropdown menu.

2

Click to enlarge

You can select sentence case, lower case, upper case, capitalize each word, or try the odd toggle case. Simple and no more retyping.

Hiding Posts and Unfollowing Friends on Facebook

Do you have a Facebook friend who, at certain times of the year, posts too much about sports, politics or religion and you don’t want to see them in your News Feed, but you don’t want to unfriend them? Facebook has come up with a way for you to silence these contacts, but remain friends with them. This means you can still visit their profile and post on their wall if you wish, but their updates won’t appear in your News Feed. There are two ways to do this: “Hide Posts” or “Unfollow” the person.

You can do both on the News Feed itself. When you see a post on your News Feed that you would rather not, click the “V” in the top right corner:

1

You will see a few options. I can “Hide post,” meaning that this particular post will disappear from my feed, and Facebook will use its enigmatic algorithm to determine how to show me less content similar to this in the future. My friend, Justen will still appear in my feed. But if Justen has offended me, and I don’t want to hear anything he has to say on Facebook anymore, I can click “Unfollow Justen.” This means his posts will no longer appear in my News Feed. He and I will remain friends, and I can take any action as his friend. I can still see his posts if I go directly to his profile.

2

If this post violates Facebook’s standards, you can click “Report post.” Facebook will then review the post and potentially review it. The friend in question will not know you reported them.

Another way to unfollow someone is to go to their profile page directly and click the Following tab:

3

From here you will have the option to click “Unfollow.”

4

Now your News Feed will be filled with news you actually want to see!

Customize Chrome Start Pages

If you are using Google’s Chrome browser for the desktop (and why wouldn’t you?) did you know you can have it open to whatever page – or pages – you want? If you like to see your Gmail when opening the browser in the morning or headlines from Crain’s or the weather for the day you can set Chrome to open one or many pages to get you going. Or, perhaps you would like to continue where you left off from the previous browsing session? Read on to learn how!

By default the Chrome start page (the page Chrome shows you when you launch the browser) shows the Google search bar and thumbnails of the websites you most frequently visit. However, you can change that to open any page or pages that you want.

Click to Expand

Open Pages on Start in Chrome

 

To set the browser to open a specific page or pages when you launch you will need to be signed into Chrome. Then in the top right corner click on the Chrome menu (three horizontal lines stacked on each other). Click Settings – On Startup – Open a specific page or set of pages. Then click “Set pages” and enter the web address of the page(s) you want to see when you open Chrome. Then click “OK”.

 

Click to Expand

Continue Where You Left Off in Chrome

If you would like to see the last tabs you had open before you closed the browser click on the Chrome menu in the top right and then click “Settings”. Under “On Startup” select “Continue” where you left off.  If you allow cookies to be saved you will still be logged into any websites you were visiting before. If you do NOT want to be automatically signed into these pages in “Settings” go to “Show Advanced Settings” and under “Privacy” click “Content Settings”. Under the “Cookies” section choose “keep local data only until you quit your browser” and then click “Done”. When you close your browser you will be logged out of all the sites you were logged into. This is a good security measure, especially if you share you computer.

In addition to the start page, Google’s Chrome also has a Home page you can enable and customize. This is located next to the left of the address bar. In “Settings” go to “Appearance” and check “Show Home button” and below that click “Change” to choose your homepage.

Finally, the Bookmarks Bar in Chrome will link you directly to your favorite sites. When adding bookmarks click on the star icon in the address bar then choose “Bookmarks Bar” from the drop-down menu. You can add folders (and subfolders) to the bookmarks bar too! If you want to add a bookmark or folder of bookmarks just go to the Bookmark Manager (CTRL + Shift + O in Windows; CMMD + Shift + 0 in Mac) and drag and drop the icon or folder into Bookmarks Bar.  Be aware you have limited space in the Bookmarks Bar so choose wisely. If you can’t see the Bookmarks Bar go into “Settings” and under “Appearance” choose “Always show the bookmarks bar”.

Bookmarks Bar in Chrome

Bookmarks Bar in Chrome

Trust Accounting Questions and Answers with the Experts

At the CBA’s recent 2 hour CLE program “Everything You Need To Know About Trust Accounting” (now available to watch on demand) we had so many questions for our panelists that they didn’t have time to answer them all. However, our intrepid experts – Dan Cotter, David Holterman and Mary Andreoni – took the time to respond to some of the attendee’s questions below. Please note: The responses expressed here are solely those of the individual panelists. They are provided as only general input and should not be considered advisory opinions regarding any specific factual scenarios.

Q: If you work as a  Guardian Ad Litem & receive money before you perform your duties, does that money need to be in an IOLTA account since you really don’t represent a client?

A: [Mary Andreoni] If the “GAL” does not represent a client,  ILRPC 1.15 is not triggered and the  money in question does not go into an IOLTA  account.

Q: Scenario: – Lawyer/Lawfirm is holding Settlement proceeds in IOLTA account. – Client can’t be located despite reasonable efforts made. – There is a clear, signed, contingent fee agreement setting forth lawyer’s percentage of fee to be earned for services rendered. Question: Can a lawyer/lawfirm take its portion of the proceeds pursuant to the signed fee agreement and leave the remainder of client’s proceeds in the IOLTA account?

A: [Mary Andreoni] No.  The law firm can withdraw its fees if the client specifically authorized the law firm to withdraw its contingent fee from the settlement proceeds before the client disappeared. See, In re Walner, 519 N.E.2d at 908, and ISBA Opinion Nos. 95-11 (Jan. 1996) and 88-4 (Feb. 1989).  Without the client’s authority to the settlement distributions, the law firm must maintain the settlement proceeds in the IOLTA account until authority is obtained from either the client or elsewhere (e.g., court).  See ISBA Op. 02-02 (Nov. 2002).

Q: Do you need to maintain an IOLTA account for ARDC purposes (it’s part of annual registration) if you are not holding client funds?

A: [Mary Andreoni] No.  Supreme Court Rule 756(d) requires all Illinois lawyers to disclose whether they or their law firm maintained a trust account during the preceding year and to disclose whether the trust account was an IOLTA (Interest on Lawyer Trust Account) trust account, as defined in ILRPC 1.15(f) of the Rules of Professional Conduct. If a lawyer did not maintain a trust account, the lawyer is required to disclose why no trust account was maintained.

A: [David Holterman] I agree.  Rule 1.15 and its specific requirements to hold funds in an IOLTA or other client trust account are “triggered” when a lawyer comes to possess funds of a client or third person in connection with a representation. (See paragraph a.)

Q: How would you handle an emergency matter (e.g., an Order of Protection) where the client retains you and asks you to file a case (for which the client must incur costs) on the same day, before the retainer check is able to clear?

A: [Mary Andreoni]  The lawyer may pay the expense on behalf of the client, which is permitted under ILRPC 1.8(e)(1), and deposit the client’s check into the lawyer’s business account as reimbursement for the lawyer’s advance.

A: [David Holterman] If the check is only for court costs and/or a flat fee charged by the lawyer, I agree it can be deposited in the lawyer’s business account. If the client’s check includes any additional amounts – e.g. for a security retainer – then the check should be deposited in the IOLTA account with the appropriate amounts withdrawn by the lawyer for reimbursement.

Q: Is it permissible to state in one’s Client Engagement Letter that the attorney may withdraw funds from the security retainer account as the work is performed, and then send a statement at the end of the month? Must a statement actually be sent each time a withdrawal is to be made to give the client an opportunity to say “NO” even if it’s agreed up front that the lawyer may withdraw funds as and when earned?

 A: [Dan Cotter] Yes, it is permissible.  While a statement is not required by the rules, it is best practices to stay in communications with the client.  One of the biggest reasons for complaints against attorneys is lack of communication.  The invoice or notice of work done for withdrawal is an opportunity to communicate with the client and keep the client informed of where the case or matter is at.

 Q: Can the client advance a retainer for tax benefit (deductability)?

 A: [Mary Andreoni] No. The client’s desire to minimize the client’s tax obligations is not an appropriate use of an advance payment retainer. Advances covered by ILRPC 1.15 are funds received by a lawyer in connection with the payment of legal fees and expenses of the representation.  An advance payment retainer must meet the requirements of ILRCP 1.5(c).  The requirements of Rule 1.15(c) must be read in conjunction with the Dowling case.  As such, an advance payment retainer must be used sparingly and only where it is in the client’s interest as it relates to the client’s responsibility to pay the lawyer’s fees and expenses.

A: [David Holterman] In addition to Dowling, Comments [3A] – [3D] to Rule 1.15 are useful for understanding the requirements of paragraph (c).

 Q: What does a sole practitioner do about succession/access to Iolta funds after incapacity or death?

A: [Catherine Sanders Reach] There is guidance from the IARDC for succession planning and your IOLTA funds in The Basic Steps to Ethically Closing a Law Practice, from the Michigan Bar Association’s guide “Planning Ahead: A Guide to Protecting Your Clients’ Interests in the Event of Your Disability or Death” and in the Chicago Bar Association CLE program “Succession Planning to Cover Bumps in the Road 

Q: If you charge a fixed fee but the fee does not include a government fee and the client pays it separately and provides it to the attorney so that it can be included with the file that the attorney will mail to the government institution, does the government fee have to go in an IOLTA account?

 A: [Dan Cotter] I don’t believe so.  If the check is made payable to the government, then the fees do not appear from this scenario to be entrusted to the attorney as fiduciary.

A: [David Holterman] I agree that a separate check made payable to the government entity can be passed on to the entity. If it is a separate check payable to the attorney, then it should be processed through the IOLTA account.

Q: If I represent a client who resides or works in another state, and I hold funds for him/her in a trust account, am I subject to trust accounting rules of the client’s home state? Do the rules of one state or the other govern in the event of a conflict?

 A: [Mary Andreoni] You should follow the rules of the jurisdictions in which you open the trust account.  To the extent there are any inconsistencies between the rules of one state and the lawyer’s licensing jurisdiction, those inconsistencies should be resolved by reference to ILRPC 8.5(b).

 A: [David Holterman] Under the framework of Rule 1.15, the client trust account requirement follows the lawyer, not the client. Paragraph a states that funds should be deposited in a client trust account “maintained at an eligible financial institution in the state where the lawyer’s office is situated, or elsewhere with the informed consent of the client.” If the client trust account is maintained in the client’s state, the lawyer must follow the trust account/IOLTA requirements of that state.

Thanks to our panelists for being so generous with their time and knowledge!

Use Ctrl+F to Search Data with Ease

If you’re confused about what CTRL+F is, you are not alone – according to Dan Russell, a search anthropologist at Google, 90% of people do not know how to properly use CTRL+F to locate a word in a document or on a webpage. This tool will save you time and the embarrassment of missing a keyword or phrase that should’ve been replaced. Whether you are using your browser or your word processor, CTRL+F will speed your work up immensely.

Ctrl+ F works wherever you are: web browsers (Google Chrome, Firefox, Safari, etc.) word processing programs (Microsoft Word, WordPerfect, etc.), or  PDFs viewers like Acrobat Reader. Pressing the keyboard keys “CTRL” (“Command” on a Mac) and “F” at the same time will help you find any specific phrase, clause, or word you are looking for by typing them into a box that appears on your screen. The “find” box may appear in different locations on the screen depending on which program you are using – but it will always appear.

In A Web Browser

When searching through an online document or a webpage for specific mention of a word, phrase, or number, CTRL+F can save a lot of time. Simply press the keys CTRL and F and enter the desired term, phrase, number, word, or clause into the Find box that appears. In Internet Explorer your search term will be highlighted and each time you select “Find Next” the search will move through the document highlighting the usage of the designated word, number, or phrase.

1

Click to enlarge.

For instance, say you need to find the contact information for a specific judge in the Criminal Division of the Circuit Court of Cook County, but you only know that his first name is John. Go to the court’s website listing of judges in this division, and then you can use CTRL+F to accelerate your search. Enter “John” in the search bar and press <Enter>. The search will bring you directly to any mention of “John” on the page. Pressing <Enter> again will bring you to the next entry of “John” on the page if there is one.

In Microsoft Word

When working in Microsoft Word, CTRL+F opens the Navigation pane and you can search for a word, phrase or number. You will see all of the instances of your search term appear in the Navigation pane with the word in bold and can quickly jump to that portion of the document. Take it one step further and use the Navigation pane to find a word or phrase – and then replace it! From the Navigation pane click on the “carat” (arrow) to open a toolbar with more options, including Replace.

2

For example, the client’s total damages have increased and a complaint must be updated before filing suit. Rather than locating each time the initial damages are mentioned within the complaint by scrolling through the document, you can quickly make the corrections by using CTRL+F. Just key CTRL+F,  type in the original dollar amount, click on the carat to show Options and click on Replace. The original amount will appear in “Find What”. You can then add the updated amount in the “Replace With” field. If you want to replace any incident of the number, phrase, or word in the “Find What” field, select “Replace All.”

3

There may be cases where you do not want to “Replace All” but only “Replace” some. For example, a brief cites Wickard v. Filburn in several locations, however sometimes the citation is not as appropriate as that of say, Horne v. Dept. of Agriculture.

“Replace All” would not work in this example because the initial phrase of “Wickard v. Filburn” would still apply in many of its uses. Instead, select “Replace” and let the find feature bring you through the entire document. When you find items you would like to replace, select “Replace” again; when you find items you want to leave as is, select “Find Next” and move on.

4

Conclusion

Once you get comfortable using CTRL+F in your searches and writing, you’ll wonder what took you so long to learn this important skill.

Reverse Image Search with Google

Did you know you can search a picture? If you ever wanted to find out information about an image, you can use Google’s “Reverse image search.” Google can then find related images and tell you what websites are hosting them. Images of a place can lead … [Read more]

Expand Your Practice with Client Centric Strategies

Preserving the old ways from being abused. Protecting the new ways, for me and for you. What more can we do? - The Kinks, Village Green Preservation Society Lawyers in Chicago can look forward to Spring for change and renewal - and the Client … [Read more]

Google Drive Collaboration Cheat Sheet

Even if you have been using Google Drive for multi-user collaboration since the day it came out, there is always more to learn. Below are a few tips and tricks I learned while researching the topic for a complete (but quick) guide to Google Drive … [Read more]

Quickly Change Letter Casing in Microsoft Word

It was there all along, but you may not have noticed it: the capitalization menu in Microsoft Word.   Quickly change the casing in any word document by highlighting the selected text, mousing over to the Change Case menu and click the … [Read more]

Hiding Posts and Unfollowing Friends on Facebook

Do you have a Facebook friend who, at certain times of the year, posts too much about sports, politics or religion and you don’t want to see them in your News Feed, but you don’t want to unfriend them? Facebook has come up with a way for you to … [Read more]

Customize Chrome Start Pages

If you are using Google’s Chrome browser for the desktop (and why wouldn’t you?) did you know you can have it open to whatever page – or pages – you want? If you like to see your Gmail when opening the browser in the morning or headlines from Crain’s … [Read more]

Trust Accounting Questions and Answers with the Experts

At the CBA's recent 2 hour CLE program "Everything You Need To Know About Trust Accounting" (now available to watch on demand) we had so many questions for our panelists that they didn't have time to answer them all. However, our intrepid experts - … [Read more]

Use Ctrl+F to Search Data with Ease

If you’re confused about what CTRL+F is, you are not alone – according to Dan Russell, a search anthropologist at Google, 90% of people do not know how to properly use CTRL+F to locate a word in a document or on a webpage. This tool will save you … [Read more]

Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin