Your Dropbox Questions Answered

During the recent program “How to… Use Dropbox for File Management” (now available for free in the archives for CBA members) I received a number of great followup questions. Here they are, with my answers.

Q: My opposing counsel sent some documents to me in (I think) Dropbox and the email notice said access would expire after 48 hours. Is this common?

A: I can’t find any way to make a file expire via a link or shared folder in Dropbox. It must have been another service. I know in Hightail (fka YouSendIt) you can set a file to expire, as well as Acrobat SendNow – both popular services to share large files.

Q: Is it possible to use Dropbox to backup e-mail correspondence and folders, say from Outlook? I have been using Dropbox for a few months already but cannot figure out how could I achieve that. Thanks!

A: In MS Outlook you can set an automatic archive to save the .pst file to Dropbox. See these instructions: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/830119. You can do this for all folders, or just specific folders.

Another option is to use Adobe Acrobat Pro to save emails and/or folders to PDF and then save them to a local drive or to Dropbox. In MS Outlook 2010, if you have Adobe Acrobat X Pro installed, right click on an individual email or on a folder. In the resulting drop down menu you should see the option to “convert to PDF”. Just follow the instructions on the screen and set the save location as a Dropbox folder. Or click on the Adobe PDF tab in MS Outlook to set automatic archives for folders.

I prefer the PDF format to .pst because you can open a PDF with any PDF reader, whereas you can only open .pst folders with MS Outlook (or a third party viewer).

Q: Can we limit a shared file with a client to “read only”?

A: Whether providing a link to a file with a client, or sharing a folder of documents with a client, Dropbox does not offer a “read only” function. You can send a client a link to a file – versus sharing a folder with a client – and they can view the file OR download it. So, if they download it they can edit it – if you don’t protect it first. You can accomplish that by restricting the original file before you make it available to clients via Dropbox.

Before sharing a MS Word file in Dropbox:

In MS Word 2010 go to the “Review” tab and choose “restrict editing” and then choose “no changes (read only)” from the drop down menu, like this:

restricteditingmsword

Before sharing a PDF in Dropbox:

In Adobe Acrobat X go to File – Properties and choose the “security” tab. Choose “password security” from the drop down menu and you will get this screen:

restricteditingadobeacrobat

Under Permissions check “restrict editing…” and create a password (which will allow you to make changes, but not anyone else). Then choose if you want to allow printing or not, and keep the default “Changes Allowed: None”.

If you have older versions of these software applications you still can modify permissions, they are just in a slightly different place.

Q: I set up my own Dropbox account, and then my boss shared some doc’s with me via Dropbox. However, I can only access the doc’s he shared with me via a link in the e-mail he sent me. I cannot access them through my own Dropbox account. Does this make sense, and do you know how this may have happened?

A: This issue points to the difference between sharing a link and inviting collaborators to a folder in Dropbox. In order for you to see the files he puts in his Dropbox folder that he wants you to have access to in your Dropbox he must go to Dropbox (screenshots are from the web interface) and right click on the folder he wants to share with you. He will see this menu:

shareversuslink

Then instead of choosing “share link” choose “invite to folder”. He will get a dialog box and will put in your email address and a note (if he likes). Then you will both have access to that folder. If he makes a change to any of the documents on his hard drive, and the folder is synchronized, then you will have access to the latest versions of the documents.

Do you have a question about Dropbox or another technology? Got something to add to the answers above? Let me know in the comments!

Power up the free Google Calendar

There’s plenty to take advantage of in the free Google Calendar—features like creating and sharing multiple calendars, “quick add” smart appointments and the ability to make calendars public. In this article I dig in to unearth a few neat tricks to integrate your Calendar more tightly with Gmail and Tasks. With some exploring and clicking, you will find the free Google Calendar and productivity tools are quite robust, and with a little know-how, have more integration than meets the eye. Check it out … 

Want more? Watch the training video from the Chicago Bar Association and check out these articles and resources:

Lawyers Moving to Windows 8?

Microsoft’s newest operating system, Windows 8, released on October 26, 2012.  It is optimized for touch screen computing and completely revamps the user interface. Recently a CBA member asked me if I was aware if law firms were switching to Windows 8.  My response, in part:

“I haven’t heard of any firms switching to Windows 8, though it will become more difficult to order new computers, especially from big box retail stores, without the new OS. I would recommend against it until we know how the software that lawyers tend to use (practice management, PDF creation, etc.) works with it. I haven’t heard of any compatibility issues, but that is likely because few have made the move.”

Legal bloggers advise caution before moving to the new OS. Here are some thoughts from the legal blogosphere:

As I mentioned, getting a new PC with an older (Windows 7) version of the operating system will be increasingly difficult. If you are in the market for a new PC and are not interested in Windows 8 this is a good time to buy while you still have choices.

Here are a few reviews of Windows 8 from technology publications:

Note that older machines may not have the computing power to run Windows 8 and all reviewers agree that users of the older Windows operating system will have to re-learn something they have been familiar with for years.

Change is often challenging. Microsoft’s new OS is attempting to bring the best of traditional computing and ease of use of tablet computing together. As with any major change to a familiar product there will be a time of (sometimes painful) transition. Add the increasing dominance of cloud computing options that make decisions about operating system de minimis and computer users should at least smile at the increased opportunity for choice in today’s technology market.

BYOD: iPad (Bring Your Own Device)

The iPad is quickly becoming a “must-have” for every lawyer. It’s more than a Smartphone but not quite a laptop…it’s more like an “electronic legal pad.” Lawyers are finding the iPad to be the perfect tool for reading books, annotating documents, taking notes, catching-up on news, surfing the Web, giving presentations, and a myriad of other tasks. Whether you’ve had an iPad for one week or one year, you’ll learn something new in this half day seminar. Bring your iPad for a hands-on environment as our expert and panelists walk you through the apps you need and how to use them.

Learn how the iPad can become an essential part of your daily workflow:

• Introduction and tour of the iPad
• Recommended settings for the iPad
• Uploading documents to the iPad
• The 10 “Must-Have” iPad apps for lawyers
• Presentations and the iPad in the courtroom
• iPad peripherals (case, keyboard, etc)
• And much more!

See demos of iPad apps for lawyers from sponsors:

TrialWorks Case Management Software app for litigators
Total Attorneys practice management app
Lexis Advance legal research app

Speaker:

Brett Burney, J.D., Burney Consultants LLC, Cleveland
Burney received his B.A. from the University of North Texas and his J.D. from the University of Dayton School of Law. He is the founder of his firm and provides professional consulting services for electronic discovery, litigation support and trial technology to corporate executives and legal professionals. Prior to establishing his firm, Burney spent five years at Thompson Hine LLP in Cleveland. He is a frequent speaker at numerous legal technology conferences and is a well-respected author on legal technology topics.

PLUS! ABA Law Practice Management Section will be on hand with the hugely popular “iPad in One Hour” book series including: iPad in One Hour (2nd edition), iPad Apps in One Hour and pre-sales of iPad in One Hour for Litigators.

This program will be at the Chicago Bar Association on Monday, November 19, 2013 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Sign up now before it fills up!

Asana vs. Trello: Checklist Collaboration Tools Compared

My new article in Attorney at Work: Asana vs. Trello: Checklist Collaboration Tools Compared

In his book The Checklist Manifesto, surgeon Atul Gawande asserts that checklists are a “cognitive net,” a mechanism that can help prevent experienced people from making errors due to flawed memory and attention, and ensure that teams work together. Or, as Steven Levitt of Freakonomics fame put it, “the book’s main point is simple: no matter how expert you may be, well-designed checklists can improve outcomes.”

In a law office, checklists help reduce errors and increase efficiency. They ensure that work is done, and in an order that makes the most sense. They can also be used as part of a task management system, showing each person in the organization how her responsibilities on the checklist affect the entire procedure. Two collaboration tools that specifically focus on lists and tasks were recently launched online. One, Asana, created by former Facebook employees, provides a web-based “to do” list for up to 30 people to share. The other, Trello, lets users create shared boards with task cards. Both are free.

So which one is better for task and project management based on procedural checklists? Let’s compare.

Security Simplified

The folks at the SANS Institute want to make it easier for small businesses and individuals to keep up with security risks. They offer two proactive and useful free resources to help keep up with new security threats, best practices, and security education.

  1. OUCH is a monthly newsletter in PDF that provides an overview of a security issue, followed by a more detailed article, then resources to learn more. The newsletter is written in plain language and recently has covered issues such as identifying counterfeit websites, using the cloud safely, disposing your mobile devices safely, and metadata. Subscribe for free to receive these short, well written topical security overviews. OUCH is “distributed under the Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 3.0 license. You are encouraged to distribute OUCH! within your organization or share with anyone you like as long as it is not used for commercial purposes.”
  2. For a daily dose of security tips, subscribe to the Security Awareness Tip of the Day.  You can subscribe via RSS feed, follow them on Twitter, or visit the site.

If you are interested in learning more about security for your law practice, LPMT will be offering a CLE course on November 20 from 12-1:30 with guest speaker Kevin Thompson.  Watch the CLE announcements for registration and course description.

Upcoming LPMT Programs and Training

Don’t miss upcoming CLE programs and free training sessions:

Coming up in August:

  • How to… Take Control of Social Media with Hootsuite
  • How Lawyers Can Use Collaboration Tools

Coming up in September:

  • How to… Use MS OneNote for Project Management
  • How to… Automate Functions in MS Word
  • Smarter, Better, Faster: Document Assembly

Coming up in October:

  • How to…  Get the Most Out of LinkedIn
  • How to…  Manage Complex Tasks in Basecamp
  • How to…  Use MS Outlook Add-ons
  • Intersection of Ethics and Technology

PLUS Law Firm Startup Bootcamp on Oct. 4 – everything you need to know to start (or update) your law firm!

Register online at the Chicago Bar Association – CLE - CLE Seminars  and check the LPMT “Upcoming Programs” calendar for program descriptions, dates and times.

Power Down: Business Continuity Planning for Law Firms

The derecho that swept from Chicago to Washington DC on Friday, June 29 left millions in the Midwest and mid-Atlantic without power for days. A post in Forbes highlights our increasing reliability on the power grid, and the need for diversification of risk with cloud services to avoid downtime.

Business continuity plans are designed to help a firm respond to any type of disaster, from a hard drive failure to a hurricane.  They incorporate not only technology backup plans, but also illustrate when the plan should be put into action and to what extent. They identify key players, and what to do if those essential personnel aren’t available.

The ABA Committee on Disaster Response and Preparedness had BDA Global, LLC prepare a planning guide for law firms to use to create a business continuity plan. Freely available, this  guide includes step by step explanations of what should be in the plan, how to create a plan and includes a sample plan in the appendix. In the foreword former ABA President Steve Zack notes:

Disaster planning is especially important for lawyers. Not only is it necessary to protect, preserve, and in extreme cases rebuild one’s practice or firm, lawyers also have special obligations to their clients. Lawyers must represent the client competently and diligently, safeguard client’s property, and maintain client confidentiality and communications. These obligations are neither excused nor waived following a disaster.

The guide is an excellent resource, as well as the other resources at www.americanbar.org/disaster, in helping law firms plan for the inevitable.

Some Technology Backup Best Practices

  • Maintain geo-redundant backups
  • Regularly do test restores and create written instructions for restoring
  • Keep all software license numbers and installation discs
  • Create images for computers and file servers
  • Keep a local copy of cloud data
  • Consider how data created on mobile devices is backed up
  • Have a current and accurate network diagram

More information regarding computer backups, risk management and disaster recovery are available from the ABA Disaster Planning website on the Resources for Lawyers and Law Firms page.

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